Meridian Clock (MM10)

Time for the TCVM! Clock designed to illustrate the five Elements, twelve Meridians, six Channels and the path of Qi energy as the day progresses
SKU: MM10
$59.00

The Meridian clock, spanning 13.5” in diameter, is a working timepiece designed to illustrate the five Elements, twelve Meridians, six Channels and the path of Qi energy as the day progresses. It can be used to assist diagnosis, based on when symptoms appear in a Meridian or a Channel, and to enhance clinical results by performing treatments during the time Qi is concentrated in a pathway. This colorful clock can be hung on a wall or stand on its own. It’s also a great way to start a conversation with clients about chronobiology.

 

­This clock tells time and is an illustration of the path of Qi (Chi) or life force through the acupuncture meridians of the body during a 24-hour circadian day.  It represents the five element, six channel, and 12 meridian theories of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (TCM/TCVM).  The clock is intended as a teaching tool and as an aid to diagnosis and timing of treatment.

                                                                                                                                         

Summary of Five Elements in the Clock Face

 

In TCM, the Five Elements are Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water.  Each of the elements has a Yin and Yang partnered meridian, and each of those has a corresponding physical location in the body.  Therefore each element has 2 meridians, with the exception of Fire which has 4 (2+2+2+2+4=12 Meridians).

 

The colors on the clock face correspond to the partnered meridians: Yin partners are darker and more consolidated, and Yang partners are lighter and more expanded.

 

ELEMENT

PARTNER

MERIDIAN

COLOR

Wood

Yin

Liver

Forest Green

Wood

Yang

Gall Bladder

Apple Green

Fire

Yin

Heart

Red

Fire

Yang

Small Intestine

Pink

Fire

Yin

Pericardium

Magenta

Fire

Yang

Triple Heater

Light Raspberry

Earth

Yin

Spleen

Terracotta

Earth

Yang

Stomach

Bright Yellow

Metal

Yin

Lung

Pewter

Metal

Yang

Large Intestine

Silver

Water

Yin

Kidney

Deep Blue

Water

Yang

Bladder

Bright Blue


From Wood springs Fire, the ash forms the Earth, which builds into mountains containing the Metals, and the rains shed from the mountains to form Water, which then nourishes the trees for Wood, and so the Shen (creation) and so the horary (hourly) cycle continues.

Summary of Six Channels and Meridians

CHANNEL

FORELIMB MERIDIAN

HINDLIMB MERIDIAN

Tai Yin: “Great Yin

Lung

Spleen

Shao Yin: “Lesser Yin

Heart

Kidney

Jue Yin: “Persistent or Terminal Yin

Pericardium

Liver

Yang Ming: “Brightest Yang

Large Intestine

Stomach

Tai Yang: “Greater Yang

Small Intestine

Bladder

Shao Yang: “Lesser Yang

Triple Heater

Gall Bladder

 

The Yin & Yang partners travel together in 4-hour blocks, with the two blocks of Fire balanced on either side of the watery hours of the afternoon.  The general pattern is Yin-Yang-Yang-Yin.  Although this clock depicts the energy of each meridian in distinct two hour blocks, there are major and minor Chi cycles, i.e., 24 hour, 24 minute, 24 second.  The Chi is not limited; it is just concentrated during the blocks.

 

 

Example of How Circadian Time Applies to the Channels and Meridians

 

1:00 – 3:00 am

The earliest hours of the morning are devoted to the most profound Yin energy, with terminal or “Jue Yin” in the Liver at the end of the circadian day.

3:00 – 5:00 am

Greater or “Tai Yin” in the Lung as the next day begins.

5:00 – 7:00 am

The brightest Yang energy “Yang Ming” through the Stomach.

7:00 – 9:00 am

The brightest Yang energy “Yang Ming” through the Large Intestine.

9:00 – 11:00 am

Greater or “Tai Yin” in the Spleen.

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Lesser or “Shao Yin” in the Heart and so forth.


The Path of Chi During the Circadian Day

 

  •   The path of Chi begins on the inner ring of the clock from 3:00 am to 5:00 am in the Lung meridian when you "take a big breath". 
  •   The energy then moves to the Large Intestine from 5:00 am to 7:00 am when you head to the bathroom to eliminate your waste. 
  •   The energy, having traveled down and up the front limb and to the corner of the nose, now shifts to the Stomach meridian.  Having smelled, seen, and eaten your breakfast, the energy moves down the body to the hind limb from 7:00 am to 9:00 am.
  •   From 9:00 am to 11:00 am, the energy moves to its Yin Earth partner Spleen as you digest breakfast and start to put it to good use.
  •   From 11:00 am to 1:00 pm, the energy moves to the Heart meridian and you do whatever it is you are passionate about, which is your “hearts work.”
  •   Having arrived at the outer ring of the clock, we take a break from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, to have lunch with Heart's Yang Fire partner Small Intestine, both in the front limb.
  •   Then starts the afternoon with tea, during the Bladder meridian from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm,
  •   Then to happy hour with the Kidney meridian from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm.
  •   You go home, and from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm  you have dinner with your family during the energy’s Pericardium period, when they may ask you “how was your day?” giving you an opportunity to process your emotions and protect your heart.
  •   If you are smart you will go to bed sometime between 9:00 pm to 11:00 pm and not grow a big cortisol stress belly during Triple Heater time.
  •   Sleep allows the body to detoxify and process waste during the Gall Bladder meridian time, 11:00 pm to 1:00 am.
  •   The terminal Yin Energy of the day moves through the Liver Meridian from 1:00 to 3:00 am, when the cycle comes to an end and restarts with Lung at 3:00 am.

 

In general, if a symptom appears during a particular time phase consistently, evaluate the meridian and corresponding organ. If you wish to enhance treatment results, you may time treatment during a transit through the corresponding meridian or channel.

 

"This project sprang from my work for Dr. Huisheng Xie at The Chi Institute of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine in Reddick, Florida. I know I speak for many other veterinarians and pet owners when I thank Dr. Xie and his talented staff for bringing the gifts of Tui-na, Herbal and traditional nutritional Medication and Acupuncture from Beijing to my patients and to my world.  Special thanks to Dr. Roger Clemmons for sharing his wit and wisdom, Drs. Gregory Todd, Cheryl Chrisman, Skip Hightman and Carolina Medina for their mentorship, and to Dr. Bruce Ferguson for his vital contribution." - Author Dr. Ashley Paper at Saint Augustine FL

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